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Archive for the ‘Power and responsibility’ Category

Why do we find it difficult to share power with learners?

April 5th, 2012

Why is it often difficult to give up control and share power with our learners, even when we believe this is important? Jenny Whatman says she drew her inspiration from an incident that occurred more than 30 years ago, when she was a drama teacher in an Auckland secondary school. You’ll have a chance to explore these ideas through process drama in the “sharing power and responsibility” entry point session at the 2012 Shifting Thinking Workshop

Power and responsibility, Workshop 2012 , , , ,

Entry point: sharing power and responsibility

April 2nd, 2012

At the last Shifting Thinking conference I was involved in the play Rachel wrote to start day 2. That was the first public drama/theatre experience I’d been part of for a few years. Last week Elizabeth and I planned our 2012 workshop: entry point – Sharing Power and Responsibility. Even though we are friends from way back, we’ve never actually planned or taught drama together. Elizabeth was involved teaching ECE and primary children, I taught secondary students, and we have both taught pres-service and in-service adults in different cities. I thought I might have “forgotten” how to create process drama; Elizabeth’s colleague assured me that “it’s like riding a bicycle, you won’t have forgotten”. She was right. The drama we planned last week is very different from the performance of a play script although it draws on many of the same theatrical devices. Elizabeth made beautiful sketches in pencil; I wrote notes on the i-pad. Elizabeth had found a useful framing from Canadian Brian Edmiston to guide our thinking.  DIAGRAM- desc context – pstn word doc Edmiston_1. We had a number of considerations to juggle – the themes of the conference, the entry point theme, using drama processes. Our biggest concern was that we model sharing. That we planned and ran a workshop that exemplified the sharing of power but that did not compromise the integrity of the experience for all participants. It had to work for 10 people or 100.

Power and responsibility, Workshop 2012